Why Might We Not Pray?

A study based on the sermon  Is There Grass On Your Path?

  1. In the sermon we looked briefly at the following scriptures: James 4:1-2, Isaiah 59:1-2, 2 Chronicles 16:9a. Which other verses on prayer come to mind, when thinking about our need and reluctance to pray.
  2. Take the 5 sermon headings and talk through practical applications which we could commit to taking on board (individually and as a church). The headings were:
    1. We crowd out prayer with other things
    2. Sin separates
    3. We don’t see prayer as a relationship thing
    4. We don’t appreciate the massive importance of the facts that prayer prepares us for spiritual warfare. And prayer is spiritual warfare.
    5. We think we can handle things ourselves
  3. Spend some time praying for each other.

 

A Study on Colossians 2:9-14

Some study questions based on the sermon Do You Have Real Peace?

  1. Read Colossians 2:8-14
  2. Verse 8 – How might we be captured, and by what kinds of empty philosophies and high sounding nonsense?
  3. Verses 9 & 10 – Why is it crucial that we see and believe the truth that Christ is both completely man and completely God? Also what does it mean, “that you are complete by your union with God“?
  4. Verses 11 & 12 – Discuss what we heard in the sermon about these verses on circumcision and baptism. How might we overstate or understate the importance of a public declaration of faith in baptism?
  5. Verses 13 & 14 – Pastor says, “These are powerful statements and if taken to heart will have a profound affect on the believer” Do you agree, if so (or not) why, and what difference is it going to have on your life with Christ?

Who is Jesus?

This study is based on the sermon What you see is what you get!

  1. Before reading the passage share with each other how you would answer someone who asks ‘who is Jesus Christ, and why should I be bothered?’
  2.  Reading: Colossians 1:15-20

    This passage is full of incredible and sometimes complex statements which we unpacked in the sermon.

  3. As a group take each phrase and carefully discuss what it says about the person and work of Christ
  4. What difference does having a right understanding of who He is make to us as individuals today.

Micah 5 Study

Note to leaders: As with all studies, please don’t feel you must cover all questions, fine if you can, but rather take a few of the questions and do them justice that rush through 🙂

If you missed the sermon, you can pick it up here: The King from eternity

  1. Verse 1 seems at complete odds with the rest of the chapter, what is Micah pointing to (cf. 2 Kings 25?);
  2. Bethlehem was a tiny hamlet, what else do we know about Bethlehem from the bible? Also, why would God chose Bethlehem and not Jerusalem?
  3. At the end of verse 2, consider what it means: ‘whose origins are in the distant past’. How should this impact a) our understanding of who Jesus is, b) our view of creation, c) our reading of the Old Testament?
  4. Discuss verses 3-9, what are these verses pointing to?
  5. Verses 10 to 14 at first glance look like more judgement, but are they?  – if not what are they about – if so how does it fit with the rest of the passage?
  6. Who is the last verse addressing and at which time?

A Committed Christian?

So often in our Christian lives we spend inordinate amounts of time talking about prayer, wanting to seek the Lord and do His will; which I believe are great sentiments, but as we approach the end of the year I’m drawn back to some words we used at the start of our year in our covenant service, words which were borrowed from a great puritan called Richard Alleine:

I am no longer my own but yours. Put me to what you will, rank me with whom you will; put me to doing, put me to suffering; let me be employed for you or laid aside for you, exalted for you or brought low for you; let me be full, let me be empty, let me have all things, let me have nothing; I freely and wholeheartedly give all things to you. Glorious and blessed God, Father, Son and Holy Spirit, you are mine and I am yours. So be it. This my covenant with you my God, made here on earth, let it be confirmed in heaven. Amen

Why not take that prayer again, study it, meditate on it, discuss it and consider: as individuals, and as Christ’s Church, have we yet made this prayer our own? How can we encourage one another, and what is the Lord asking of us as individuals walking in covenant with Him? If studying in a group: spend a good time in prayer seeking the Lord for each other and the wider Church. When studying alone: also, of course, pray through the issues that arise in your heart.

Pentecost

Missed the sermon? Never mind here it is: Power to Harvest

These questions are based on the first 13 verses of Acts 2

  1. There are 7 feasts or festivals that the Lord instituted (cf. Leviticus 23):
    1. what are they;
    2. when roughly do they fall;
    3. what was the original purpose of each one and what were, or will be, the eventual fulfilments for each;
    4. which have yet to be fulfilled?
  2. What was the effect of God pouring out His Spirit?
  3. Why don’t we see God doing this today?
  4. What were the believers doing before the Holy Spirit came (cf. Acts 1:14)